You've recapped every conversation that I've had since March 2020. My work told me that COVID-19 "was a personal problem" one week before the national shutdown. My boss mocked my concern and I was told that I could work from home "if that would help me feel safe".

This week, despite the evidence of the possibility of a nuclear confrontation (and who remembers that whole nuclear plant shelling that happened? Not me, thats for sure), I was told by majority of friends that "it just won't happen". But further, these arguments were never guided by opposing data or information but assertions! Look! It just won't happen alright!!

The sad part about the arguments re: nuclear war is that these assertions occur against the backdrop of preparedness. It isn't just about who is right here; the whole point of the discussion was to get in front of any possible danger to preserve the lives of loved ones. But look, it won't happen so I will not countenance any possible action to save my loved ones; but thank you for your concern.

Finally, I've noticed that this trend conceals an underlying denial and insecurity. There is a disbelief that America could ever endure scenarios like an attack on the homeland (9/11? Pearl Harbor anyone?).

Concerns about impending wheat/food shortages are simply a product of my poorly filtered newsfeeds. Inflation isn't what "you think it is". And so on, and so on.

The United States is in for a world of hurt if college educated citizens who have children to care for are openly refusing to prepare for inconvenient scenarios when presented with credible information. I worry about the considerable impact that the shock element will add to an already precarious situation.

Keep it up Umair!

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Full stack developer focusing on AI, GPT-3, Ethereum, and d’Apps. American citizen who embraces messiness. Hopefully less immature than yesterday

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Derek Martin

Derek Martin

202 Followers

Full stack developer focusing on AI, GPT-3, Ethereum, and d’Apps. American citizen who embraces messiness. Hopefully less immature than yesterday